No Spoilers: The Virgin Suicides

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides

Rating: 4 out of 5.

A novel set in the 70s’ and covering clandestine and taboo themes for the time. The Virgin Suicides is a novel that discusses the imprisonment of being an adolescent girl, during a period where woman were very much still seen as objects and a means to gain great social status. Eugenides uses a writing style that causes any reader to fall into a trap of endless hope, which he then breaks by reminding you of what the book is about.

With this recommendation, I do want to warn potential readers of grim and vivid language. Although this novel is graphic and difficult to get through, I do genuinely think it’s a story that needs to be heard. As well as following a fiction story about 5 girls through the eyes of a “young” man the novel does have many educational points that can help those you don’t understand the inner workings behind suicide attempts.

What I Saw When Reading The Book

About The Author

Jeffrey Eugenides

American novelist and short story writer, Jeffrey Kent Eugenides, was born in Detroit in 1960. He has written several essays and short stories over the years, he has also written 3 novels during his career. His most successful novel has been The Virgin Suicides, which has been translated into 34 different languages. The novel was published in 1993 then adapted to film in 1999, by critically acclaimed film director Sofia Coppola.

Jeffrey Eugenides is now a Professor of Creative Writing in the Peter B. Lewis Center for the Arts. He has continued to write short stories and submits them to The New York Time. His published work in the New York Times, could potentially lead to another novel but only time will tell.

After reading this complex but informative novel, I was glad to have read it before watching the 1999 award-winning film. So although this recommendation comes with a trigger warning, for those who choose to take on the incredible novel, you will not regret the read. The level of satisfaction I felt when I read the final lines of the book, was incredible and definitely different from any other book I’ve read in the past. All the gritty details makes the Eugenides novel a marvel.

Written by Karla Louise Hallett

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